Reflections on Alms Food

อาจารย์ อมโร

Reflections on Alms Food

Another training the Buddha described with regard to food is that to eat appropriately you should eat one mouthful at a time. That may not strike you as a novel concept. It means you eat the mouthful of food that is in your mouth, without lining up the next spoonful in a holding pattern like a plane hovering round an airport or waiting for take-off on a runway. Instead, simply be with the mouthful…

Investigating the Mind

อาจารย์ สุเมโธ

Investigating  the  Mind

If you listen to yourself very much, you can sometimes hear such statements as, ‘I should do this but I shouldn’t do that, I should be this way, I shouldn’t be that way,’ or that the world would be other than it is; our parents should be this way or that way and shouldn’t be the way they are. So we have this particular verb tense ringing through our minds because we have an idea of what shouldn’t…

Right Intent

อาจารย์ สุจิตโต

Right Intent

So right intent is an important base to cultivate. The three inclinations that make up right intent are kindness, compassion and renunciation – letting go of the pull of the senses. Tuning into and sustaining this right intent feels good: firstly it generates self-respect or freedom from regret and anxiety. Then, because we act in accordance with that right intent, it means that we make good frien…

Is Nature Fair

อาจารย์ อมโร

Is Nature Fair

The Buddha gave a small collection of teachings called the ‘Five Subjects for Frequent Recollection’ (A 5.57). The first of these is: ‘I am of the nature to age.’ The second is: ‘I am of the nature to sicken.’ The third is: ‘I am of the nature to die.’ The fourth is: ‘All that is mine, beloved and pleasing, will become otherwise, will become separated from me’; and the fifth is: ‘I am the owner of…

Jhana and Wisdom

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Jhana and Wisdom

Deep samādhi offers an experience of true silence, a profound inner solitude. It frees the mind from the inane babble of thoughts, from the tyranny of chattering opinions. True insight does not arise from reasoning. Certainly, pondering Dhamma by mulling it over in the rock-polishing tumbler of disciplined thought can pave the way to insight with smooth stones, but the pondering eventually become…

Right Samadhi

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Right Samadhi

What then is the experience of jhāna? The mind’s energy gradually pulls away from its usual dispersion at the various sense doors and gathers internally. Any negative emotions or unwholesome states of mind disappear. The sensation of having a body disappears. One feels light and joyful, and the mind becomes silent without any thinking whatsoever. The mind’s awareness then focuses more and more in…

Curiosity and Insight

อาจารย์ จันทสิริ

Curiosity and Insight

If we’re experiencing suffering we might find ourselves thinking that we have to do something, that we have to get away from it. But the Buddha said, ‘No, suffering is to be understood.’ We can’t possibly understand the suffering in our lives if we’re constantly trying to run away from it or distracting ourselves from it. So my encouragement…is to really take an interest, to be curious about your…

Reframing an Opportunity to Give

อาจารย์ ปสันโน

Reframing an Opportunity to Give

In one discourse, the Buddha speaks about the great gifts we give to countless beings by keeping the precepts. Through diligence in virtue, using the precepts to guide our conduct, we offer security to other beings—freedom from danger, fear, and animosity. These are great gifts, indeed. Similarly, in terms of our daily lives in the monastery, it’s helpful to reframe what we do and how we approach…

Skills for Letting Go

อาจารย์ ญาณิโก

Skills for Letting Go

In our practice we are normally working with the core defilements of greed, anger, and delusion. Often when these defilements arise, the way we deal with them is through restraint. When we restrain the defilements it feels different than actually letting them go. With restraint, we continue to experience the defilement; it’s an undercurrent in the mind. By contrast, when we genuinely let something…

Contentment The Way of the Noble Ones

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Contentment The Way of the Noble Ones

Chasing after the requisites of existence, trying to build an identity around them and relying on them as enduring sources of satisfaction, creates suffering. Pressures from the external world make it easy to look for something in the material world for our sense of gratification. We can see that even if it’s not gratification we seek, there is still that sense of longing to search for something n…