Heart-centred Practice

อาจารย์ วีรธัมโม

Heart-centred Practice

If you’re having trouble feeling anything in the heart, then I suggest you try to notice the sensations in that area. Get to know what that part of the body feels like as you breathe. Notice as you breathe in, it feels this way, and as you breathe out, it feels that way. Just rest your attention at the heart and become conscious of the changing sensations there. As different events unfold, this ar…

Gather the Heart Within the Breathing

อาจารย์ สุจิตโต

Gather the Heart Within the Breathing

We’re affected by our senses: sights, sounds, thoughts and the rest. Out of their contact, impressions (such as ‘threat’, ‘safe’ or ‘desirable’) wave like flags. The process of flagging things as desirable or dreadful then creates mind-states such as eagerness, worry, doubt, affection or regret. When we’re angry with someone or regret something we did in the past or hanker after something we don’t…

Always Something to Share

Ajahn Santacitto

Always Something to Share

I don’t know how many of you have ever travelled. It’s a strange experience when you’re in an entirely foreign country with an unfamiliar culture and people who speak a different language. Yet there’s always something to share. One of my fondest memories was when I was in Ethiopia hitching down to Kenya. It was night and there weren’t any cars, only a man walking in the same direction along the ro…

The Paradox of Urgency

อาจารย์ ปสันโน

The Paradox of Urgency

We may feel there exists a paradox or inconsistency having to do with some of the teachings that guide our spiritual practice and how we conduct our daily lives. First we’re told it’s important to have a sense of urgency, and then we’re told to relax, let go, and cultivate a feeling of spaciousness. On one side, the Buddha encourages us to cultivate the quality of saṃvega, which is usually transla…

The Dhamma Weapon

อาจารย์ มหา บัว

The Dhamma Weapon

The term ‘Majjhimā’, or suitability, refers to the application of the Dhamma weapon to encounter and overwhelm any kind of kilesa that might appear. When the strength of this Dhamma weapon matches the strength of the kilesas, then we can withstand them. But there is still the possibility of the kilesas overwhelming and defeating us. But if we are tough and a lot more forceful than the kilesas, the…

A Decent Education

ฐานิสสโร ภิกขุ

A Decent Education

If our education system were really designed for people, the core curriculum would teach how to live, how to die — how to deal with the big issues in life: pain, aging, illness, death, separation — because these are the things that plague people. The skills for dealing with them are the most important skills people can develop in life. But one of the problems with our society is that everything is…

Purpose 4

อาจารย์ ปัญญาวัฒโฑ

Purpose 4

In truth, we cannot really grasp anything properly, because as soon as we catch hold of it, it’s gone. We want to somehow make things belong to us and become part of us. But our attempt to grasp these things is based on a false premise. Say we buy an object and call it ours. What in that object has changed by the mere act of purchasing it? Nothing. It is the same after we bought it as it was befor…

Group Practice

อาจารย์ จันดี

Group Practice

…just this kind of gathering, a regular daily gathering to do the morning chanting, the evening chanting, doing walking meditation at the same time, sitting meditation at the same time, is that a good thing? Yes, it’s good. It helps encourage a peaceful mind… In fact, you just see what it’s like, the difference when you do something as a group. You get such encouragement from it. When you’re alone…

Desire Creeps In

อาจารย์ ปสันโน

Desire Creeps In

It’s worthwhile to watch the habits of desire and craving that keep creeping into the mind. Really notice and pay attention to desire, because it’s insidious. This isn’t meant as a commentary on anyone’s inability to recognize or understand desire or to work with it, but simply to say that it takes our concerted attention and a willingness to investigate to see how desire keeps creeping in. Most i…

Feeding as Suffering

ฐานิสสโร ภิกขุ

Feeding as Suffering

Looking at experience in terms of the five aggregates helps us to focus our attention on what the Buddha says is our fundamental activity as beings: beings have to eat. This is how they continue to be. Without taking in food—physical, mental, and emotional—we couldn’t maintain our identity as beings. Now the Buddha wants us to perceive this feeding as suffering, because only when we get past this…