English

Living in Tune

พระไตรปิฎกบาลี

Once the Blessed One was staying among the Bhaggas in the Deer Park at Bhesakaḷā Forest, near Crocodile Haunt. Then early in the morning the Blessed One, having adjusted his under robe and carrying his bowl and outer robe, went to the home of the householder, Nakula’s father. On arrival, he sat down on a seat made ready.

Then Nakula’s father & Nakula’s mother went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As they were sitting there, Nakula’s father said to the Blessed One: “Lord, ever since Nakula’s mother as a young girl was brought to me (to be my wife) when I was just a young boy, I am not conscious of being unfaithful to her even in mind, much less in body. We want to see one another not only in the present life but also in the life to come.”

And Nakula’s mother said to the Blessed One: “Lord, ever since I as a young girl was brought to Nakula’s father when he was just a young boy, I am not conscious of being unfaithful to him even in mind, much less in body. We want to see one another not only in the present life but also in the life to come.”

(The Blessed One said:) “If both husband & wife want to see one another not only in the present life but also in the life to come, they should be in tune (with each other) in conviction, in tune in virtue, in tune in generosity, and in tune in discernment. Then they will see one another not only in the present life but also in the life to come.”

Husband & wife, both of them
having conviction,
being responsive,
being restrained,
living by the Dhamma,
addressing each other
with loving words:
they benefit in manifold ways.

To them comes bliss.
Their enemies are dejected
when both are in tune in virtue.
Having followed the Dhamma
here in this world,
both in tune
in habits & practices,
they delight in the world of the devas,
enjoying the pleasures they desire.

This reflection is from the Pāli Canon, Living in Tune, Samajivina Sutta  (AN 4:55) and was translated into English by Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu

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