Mindfulness of Death, Appreciation for Life

อาจารย์ กรุณาธัมโม

Mindfulness of Death, Appreciation for Life

Luang Por Pasanno mentioned that Debbie’s mother is going to be signing into the palliative and hospice care programs because her condition is deteriorating. I would think Debbie has been practicing with death contemplation as this is happening, particularly after she lost her sister-in-law a few months ago. The Buddha encouraged us to reflect daily and remind ourselves that death can come at any…

Becoming a Somebody, Forgetting About Everybody

อาจารย์ ปสันโน

Becoming a Somebody, Forgetting About Everybody

As human beings, we each have a propensity for wanting to become a distinct somebody. This propensity shows itself almost constantly, both in formal practice and in our ordinary, day-to-day activities. It has to do with the hopeless search for worldly security and stability. Most people spend their whole lives on that search, but instead of finding security and stability, what they get is a sense…

Blown Into Cosmic Dust

อาจารย์ ปสันโน

Blown Into Cosmic Dust

The Buddha encouraged us to contemplate aging, sickness, and death every single day. It’s essential that we make an effort do that, because the mind’s nature is to forget about these contemplations. It inclines away from them and instead, inclines toward thoughts of eternal youth and health. For the most part, death doesn’t exist for us. So we have to make it conscious in our practice by realizing…

Directing Attention in a Skillful Way

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Directing Attention in a Skillful Way

Learning how to meditate—how to develop the mind—is learning how to direct attention in a skillful way. Whatever we direct our attention toward becomes our reality. If we like, we can direct attention to all the chaos in the world or to the chaos of our own personal dramas. But we don’t have to do that. We can instead direct our minds to contemplate our experiences as merely form, feeling, percept…

Which Practice is Right for Me

อาจารย์ ปสันโน

Which Practice is Right for Me

After the meal today we will be taking formal leave of Ajahn Sucitto. Living as we do in an American Buddhist monastery, we’re in a distinct minority and rather isolated. So when visiting teachers like Ajahn Sucitto come here and talk about specific practice experiences they’ve had, it’s a precious opportunity for us. Having listened to them carefully, we can then reflect on our own experience, as…

The Craft of the Heart

อาจารย์ วีรธัมโม

The Craft of the Heart

One of the observations I have reflected on lately is that our life and spiritual practice are like a craft. Both for bhikkhus and lay people, it’s a bit like the guild system in the Middle Ages. In that system, a student would be apprenticed to a master, a goldsmith for example, or a glassblower, or a potter. The master’s duty was to train the apprentice in his craft. The apprentice’s duty was to…

Quotes from No Ajahn Chah

อาจารย์ ชา

Quotes from No Ajahn Chah

The mind is intrinsically tranquil. Out of this tranquility, anxiety and confusion are born. If one sees and knows this confusion, then the mind is tranquil once more. Buddhism is a religion of the heart. Only this. One who practices to develop the heart is one who practices Buddhism. When you do something bad, there is nowhere you can go to hide. Even if others don’t see you, you must see yoursel…

The Essential Eights

ภันเต คุณรัตนะ

The Essential Eights

Dear Venerable Monks, Friends, This evening I’d like to speak on other aspects of Dhamma, which are naturally supportive factors of Dhamma, and that when we mindfully reflect on them we can see how they are related very clearly to each other. There are eight such Dhammas. Number one is called “the root of all dhammas.” Buddha said that all dhammas have their root in desire, “chandamūlakā, āvuso…

Venerable Day, Harmonious Way: What is the Lunar Observance Day?

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Venerable Day, Harmonious Way: What is the Lunar Observance Day?

This evening is our observance night, an opportunity to recollect the refuges and precepts and to take the time to reflect on the direction we want to guide our spiritual practice. In the Thai language the observance day is called the “Wan Phra,” which means “Holy Day” or “Monk Day” or maybe “Day Worthy of Veneration.” Ajahn Chah used to say, “It’s helpful having these special days. They were esta…

Recollecting the Buddha

อาจารย์ เลี่ยม

Recollecting the Buddha

So today, we’ve come to use the new place, which is still under construction. But it’s still a convenient place. It still makes for a convenient place for gathering. Because without a suitable place, then we cannot all gather together like this. But then we’re adapting to a new place we have to adapt ourselves to new conditions, particularly the weather conditions, which are a bit cooler. But then…