Rest in the Here and Now

อาจารย์ สุจิตโต

Rest in the Here and Now

The here and now that offers rest and peace is not a thought, sensation or state of mind. These things, which we customarily mistake to be the real business, continually defy and tantalize us with their scintillating changeability. Right here and now is the awareness that takes embodiment as location, empathy as felt relationship and silent attention for clarity. Embodied awareness, one that sees…

Awakening in Practical Terms

อาจารย์ ถิรธัมโม

Awakening in Practical Terms

The Buddha didn’t talk very much about awakening, but when he did he referred to it in very practical terms. For example, the word ‘nibbāna’ literally means ‘going out’, in the sense that a flame goes out. You could make a play on words by saying, ‘The candle has nibbāna-ed’. But if we translate it too literally, ‘nibbāna’ becomes ‘extinction’ – we’re going to be extinguished. This may sound ex…

Our Mother’s Love

อาจารย์ ญาณธัมโม

Our Mother’s Love

According to one of the Suttas, it is very difficult to repay the debt of gratitude to our parents. The Buddha says that even if we can carry our mother and father on our shoulders for a hundred years, we cannot fully reciprocate their kindness. Even if we were to carry them, one on each shoulder, for the rest of our lives we will still not repay the debt we owe them because the kindness they have…

The Buddha’s Autobiography

ฐานิสสโร ภิกขุ

The Buddha’s Autobiography

In telling his own story, the Buddha was not motivated by the desire, common at present, to simply tell “what it felt like to be me.” He gives very few details of his personal life, mentioning his luxurious and refined upbringing simply to prove that when he talks of the drawbacks of sensual pleasures, he’s talking from experience. Aside from that detail, he recounts only the events and decisions…

Beautiful Work, Beautiful Mind

อาจารย์ วีรธัมโม

Beautiful Work, Beautiful Mind

Whether it’s sewing robes or making a footpath, the Forest Tradition has a high standard of workmanship. But quite often we’re asked to do things we’re not competent in or used to doing. There’s a learning curve we all go through in the Saṅgha. If we’ve never had to do welding and we end up assigned a welding job, or if we’ve never been an abbot and we end up being an abbot, it becomes a real tra…

With Subrahmā

พระไตรปิฎกบาลี

With Subrahmā

Standing to one side, the god Subrahmā addressed the Buddha in verse: “This mind is always anxious, this mind is always stressed about stresses that haven’t arisen and those that have. If there is a state free of anxiety, please answer my question.” “Not without understanding and austerity, not without restraining the sense faculties, not without letting go of everything, do I see safety for livin…

Return to the Core

อาจารย์ ปสันโน

Return to the Core

From a Buddhist perspective, anything to do with other people can be considered social action: how we relate to the individuals close to us such as family or neighbours, to society at large and to the world around us. The field of social action expands out, but it begins with ourselves and our relationships to others. The individual is at the core of all relationships between any parts of society.…

The Greatest Help to the World

อาจารย์ ชา

The Greatest Help to the World

The world is in a very feverish state. The mind changes from like to dislike with the feverishness of the world. If we can learn to make the mind still, it will be the greatest help to the world. This reflection by Ajahn Chah is from the book, No Ajahn Chah, (pdf) p. 40.

Kamma and Compassion

ฐานิสสโร ภิกขุ

Kamma and Compassion

Doesn’t the teaching on kamma teach people to be callous toward the sufferings of others? No. Knowing that you have both good and bad seeds in your field that haven’t yet matured, the teaching on kamma teaches you to ask this question instead: What’s the wisest way to view other people whose bad seeds are currently sprouting? And the answer is: with compassion. Is your compassion so rarified that…

It’s Better Not to Follow the Storyline

อาจารย์ วีรธัมโม

It’s Better Not to Follow the Storyline

Sometimes it’s good to bear in mind how our uncertainties or fears compare to what other people have to go through. At times, this can help us to gain a perspective on our own situation. Nevertheless, we’re still affected by what we’re feeling… So when we have a life circumstance that brings up uncertainty or fear, the key thing is to practice with that mind-state. We can learn to bring awareness…