The Secret of Walking Meditation

อาจารย์ เลี่ยม

The Secret of Walking Meditation

The secret of walking meditation is to walk in a manner that will imprint nothing but peaceful happiness with each step. This reflection by Luang Por Liem is from the booklet, Walking with Awareness, (pdf) frame 3.

Maraṇasati

Bhikkhunī Santacittā

Maraṇasati

The practice of maraṇasati consists of three primary reflections: Death is inevitable. We cannot know when, where, and how we will die. When death comes, we will have to let go of everything. These contemplations can be done while sitting in meditation, while walking, while lying down, or whenever we think of it. We can begin by taking a few breaths and grounding in the body. We might say to ours…

Latent Tendencies: Stuff Rises Up

อาจารย์ สุจิตโต

Latent Tendencies: Stuff Rises Up

Taken as a whole, the practice of pāramī sets up values that skilfully direct the mind. Attitudes and energies that go towards self-aggrandizement, manipulation or distraction are cut off. And, as intention gets free of those biases, we notice different things – because what we look for affects what we look at. With worldly conditioning, the mind is focused on material gain, status and superficial…

Nibbidā: Disillusionment

อาจารย์ ถิรธัมโม

Nibbidā: Disillusionment

Nibbidā is an experience which is hard to explain to most people. It can be translated as disillusionment, disenchantment, or world weariness. It is an experience of being put off by or fed up with the phenomenal world, much like what happens when you suddenly see someone as they really are after being fooled by their charm for so long. Nibbidā is not simply depression or despair from facing hards…

Reframing Experience

อาจารย์ อมโร

Reframing Experience

When we experience the ordinary flow of activity – walking from one place to another, talking with a colleague, checking the time – we can notice and reframe experience. Instead of, ‘I am walking. I am talking. I am checking the time,’ we can change the framework to, ‘There is walking. There is talking. There is checking the time.’ In a sense, we can retrain the mind to see the experience of the w…

Gentle and Humble

อาจารย์ เลี่ยม

Gentle and Humble

You need to train to bring forth an attitude of gentleness and humbleness. The words “gentle” and “humble” are about our good conduct as Sangha members – something that we need to practise by ourselves and develop in ourselves. With these qualities, the Sangha is well accepted by society. Anyone who behaves gently and humbly will always be well respected, even by the devas. The devas praise gentle…

What Is Head Hair Anyway?

อาจารย์ ตั๋น

What Is Head Hair Anyway?

What is head hair anyway? Regardless of whether it is long or short, it is just the earth element; but we consider it to be our own, ourselves, and so we keep it clean and give it lots of attention and care. You have probably combed your hair and noticed that two or three hairs have fallen out. When you next see this, try reflecting on them by asking yourself: ‘Are these hairs really who I am, my…

Words: How Well Do They Work?

ฐานิสสโร ภิกขุ

Words: How Well Do They Work?

As we have noted, the Buddha saw that every truth expressed in words is instrumental, a means to an end. This is in line with the fact that all words are fabricated by the mind, and—as he himself observed—all fabrications are put together for the sake of something. They’re meant to serve an aim. The Buddha chose his words so that they would serve the most beneficial aim of all: leading the listene…

One’s Own Mind

พระไตรปิฎกบาลี

One’s Own Mind

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. There he addressed the monks: “Monks!” “Yes, lord,” the monks responded to him. The Blessed One said: “Even if a monk is not skilled in the ways of the minds of others [not skilled in reading the minds of others], he should train himself: ‘I will be skilled in reading my own mind…

Adjust the Approach

อาจารย์ มุนินโท

Adjust the Approach

Personally, I have found that when I approached practice with a striving-gaining attitude, my mind became more disturbed, not less. I spent many years trying to make my mind peaceful because that is what I understood the teachers were telling me to do. Eventually, when I came to realize that not everyone was out of balance in the way I was, I was able to accept that I needed to adjust my approach.…