I Could Die Any Time Soon

Ajahn Dtun

I Could Die Any Time Soon

You have to reflect on death because it arouses the mind, warning it to not be heedless. Death is something we must frequently recollect, for if we don’t we will just go about occupying ourselves happily throughout our days and nights, letting time drift by as days turn into weeks, weeks into months and months into years, allowing our thoughts to proliferate about ‘at the end of the year…’ or ‘at…

Feeling Happy

Ajahn Sundara

Feeling Happy

The mind that is not attached is already quite happy. This is a happiness that never goes. It is something we can taste in our meditation practice. We begin to notice that we are happy when we don’t want anything. What kind of happiness is not wanting? At the point of not wanting, we are experiencing not being reborn into something. Desire is rebirth. We are reborn all the time in this sense, so w…

Incline the Mind Toward Liberation

Ajahn Pasanno

Incline the Mind Toward Liberation

Investigate the pushes and pulls in the mind because it is that movement that takes us away from a central core of stillness and clarity that is possible to realize. We need to incline the mind toward the whole purpose of the practice and the promise of the Buddha: it’s possible to free the mind, to liberate oneself, to be peaceful and happy. This kind of happiness is not dependent on gratificatio…

Strive Diligently and Be Patient

Mae Chee Kaew

Strive Diligently and Be Patient

Strive diligently and be patient. The pace of your progress depends largely on the store of virtuous tendencies you have accumulated from the past, and on the amount of present-moment effort you put into sitting and walking meditation. So always cultivate virtue and never let evil thoughts enter your mind. The more you practice in this way, the clearer your presence of mind will become, and the mo…

Strategic Optimism

Ajahn Munindo

Strategic Optimism

It seems to me that the approach most conducive to progress on the path, and the most skilful way of dealing with feelings of fear is that of strategic optimism. When people ask me how I personally deal with challenging dilemmas, I often tell them that I am a strategic optimist. Of course, naive optimism is very dangerous, as is habitual pessimism. Both these perspectives blind us to a great many…

Producing and Consuming

Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu

Producing and Consuming

Because the activities of producing and consuming require space and time, a happiness transcending space and time, by its very nature, is neither produced nor consumed. Thus, when the Buddha reached that happiness and stepped outside the modes of producing and consuming, he was able to turn back and see exactly how pervasive a role these activities play in ordinary experience, and how imprisoning…

How Much Is Enough?

Ajahn Thiradhammo

How Much Is Enough?

Contentment and simplicity of life-style are universal aids to peace of mind, whether for a monastic or a lay person. The four basic supports for human life are food, clothing, shelter and medicine, and their purpose is to support our spiritual aspiration rather than to become self-satisfying ends in themselves. With few possessions to worry about and contentment with what we have, our life is unc…

Why Are We Eating?

Bhikkhu P.A. Payutto

Why Are We Eating?

Eating is one way of interacting with our environment; it is one form of relationship to material things. When eating, we use our tongues, our palate, to connect with external, material food; eating is therefore one aspect of ‘conduct.’ If by eating we generate advantageous, beneficial results, our conduct is considered accomplished; if, however, we generate ill-effects and cause harm, our conduct…

Rule of Thumb

Ajahn Jayasaro

Rule of Thumb

The profound teaching is whatever you can’t do yet. It’s not something that’s always intellectually difficult, but it’s profound if you haven’t yet penetrated it, you haven’t yet reached it. Indeed, it’s often the simplest and most straightforward teachings which are the most effective and produce the most meaningful change in our lives. This is a point to observe about the Dhamma - that the study…

The Truth Is Always Our Guarantee

Ajaan Suwat

The Truth Is Always Our Guarantee

When the Buddha clearly saw suffering and the cause that gives rise to suffering, he looked for a way to solve the problem. He realized that it had to be solved at the cause: the mind that’s deluded. So he developed intelligence in the area of the heart and mind, to see if the things the heart and mind are infatuated with are really worth that infatuation. Exactly how wonderful are they really? Th…