Faith

Ajahn Gambhīro

Faith

Impermanence pulls the carpet out from under our feet, but at the same time transforms our values, the qualities which we seek out as valuable in our experiences. If we don’t understand the change, it causes confusion, followed by doubt. Even though we might know what we should be doing, we get stuck in the sense of doubt and meaninglessness, and we can’t even begin. Why do you get up in the morni…

Past, Present, and Future

Ajahn Sundara

Past, Present, and Future

Luang Por Waen calls the present ‘correct Dhamma’. He refers to the past and future as ‘drunken Dhamma’. That conveys the right message. We are lost if we are not in the present moment because the present moment is mindfulness; mindfulness is present moment awareness. Past and future exist only through our thoughts, which remember the past and project the future. The Forest Masters are very creati…

The Human Capacity to Make Changes

Ajahn Jayasāro

The Human Capacity to Make Changes

The Buddha said that those who abandon foolish actions and devote themselves to the path of wisdom and compassion illumine the world like the full moon emerging from behind a cloud. Showing others through our life the human capacity to make real and positive changes is a wonderful gift that everyone of us can share with the world. This reflection by Ajahn Jayasaro is from the book, Food for the He…

On Caregiving

Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu

On Caregiving

The Buddha’s instructions on how best to approach aging, illness, and death apply to everyone: not only in the sense that we all face these facts of life, but also in the sense that we will be called upon—even before we face these facts ourselves—to give care to those who are facing them in the present. The Canon doesn’t depict a deva messenger who conveys this message. Caregivers do play—literall…

The World

Ajahn Thiradhammo

The World

I say, friend, that where one is not born, does not age or die, or pass from one state to another, or arise again — that ‘world’s end’ is not to be known, seen or reached by travelling. Yet I say that there is no end of dukkha without reaching world’s end. Rather, it is in this fathom-long body, endowed with perception and mind, that I make known the world, the arising of the world, the cessation…

Compassion Demands Response

Ajahn Pasanno

Compassion Demands Response

I would like to consider the application of these brahmaviharas. Buddhist practice is sometimes criticized as being ineffectual and quiescent—that basically the Buddha’s teaching is to sit in a quiet meditation room and placidly think thoughts of loving-kindness. But that’s not at all the Buddha’s teaching nor indeed his example. The cultivation of the brahmaviharas conditions action, as the inten…

Reflective Glory

Ajahn Kalyāno

Reflective Glory

(sent to Luang Por [Sumedho] from Thailand in June 2007) When the one who knows still listens Like a still jewel that glistens Turning the light of awareness back within It fills the present full to the brim With richest, silent meaning Past and future are no more Virtue steps to the fore And suckling turns to weaning For craving’s children They will try to drive us on Or pull us back Until we tak…

Control Your Feelings?

Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu

Control Your Feelings?

So learn how to gain some control over your feelings. Now this may sound strange. How can you control your feelings? Sometimes we have the sense that our feelings are who we really are and that they’re a given. But that’s not how the Buddha explains them. He says that in every feeling there’s an element of fabrication, i.e., an element of intention. This applies to physical feelings as well as to…

Two People Hard to Find

Pāli Canon

Two People Hard to Find

Monks, these two people are hard to find in the world. Which two? The one who is first to do a kindness, and the one who is grateful for a kindness done and feels obligated to repay it. These two people are hard to find in the world. This reflection in the Pāli Canon is from “Hard to Find,” Dullabhā Sutta (AN 2:118), translated from Pali by Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu.

Good Friends to Ourselves

Ajahn Pasanno

Good Friends to Ourselves

Another aspect that is really important is how we are a good friend to ourselves. Sometimes we are able to be good friends with others, but sometimes we may not be a good friend to ourselves. It may be that a friend makes a mistake or may have done something a bit foolish. We might say something, but it would rarely be harsh or overly critical. One would say something, but it would be out of care…