An Awakened One

Ajahn Sucitto

An Awakened One

So it is: when we enter the field of meaning, image, fable and myth arise. They sustain the collective domain. And although the way the mythic Buddha – the figure who appears in the literature, art and temples of Asia – is shaped is in accord with a culture’s expression of veneration, all accounts are consistent in presenting a person of unwavering resolve, peerless depth and steady compassion. ‘F…

Time

Ajahn Chah

Time

Time is our present breath. This reflection by Ajahn Chah is from the book, No Ajahn Chah, (pdf) p. 21.

Recognizing Stillness and Silence

Ajahn Pasanno

Recognizing Stillness and Silence

Part of cultivating and sustaining awareness is recognizing what pulls the mind out into becoming and birth. What allows the mind to turn to non-becoming, to not being born into anything? As we explore that, the mind can become very still and very silent. Allow that sense of spaciousness and silence to open up and create a wedge in the habit of movement. Rather than allowing attention to be hijack…

Turning Inward With Patience

Ajahn Jotipālo

Turning Inward With Patience

I have been listening to a few of Bhikkhu Bodhi’s talks on mettā, loving-kindness. He explained that in many practice situations, mettā can often be used with an external, outgoing energy and making a genuine wish for other people to be happy. However, there is also an internal response that can occur for us when we express mettā in this way. I was surprised when Bhikkhu Bodhi mentioned that th…

One Good Thing Done

Ajahn Sucitto

One Good Thing Done

I was reading something from a talk of Ajahn Sumedho that touched me very much. He was saying that when he’d just become a monk, he didn’t speak Thai at all and he met a Thai monk who had previously been in the Thai Navy; so, he’d met Americans and knew a bit of English. This Thai monk had been with Ajahn Chah for a while, so he was quite diligent in terms of discipline and meditation. Ajahn Sumed…

Better to Conquer Oneself

Pāli Canon

Better to Conquer Oneself

Greater in battle than the man who would conquer a thousand-thousand men, is he who would conquer just one– himself. Better to conquer yourself than others. When you’ve trained yourself, living in constant self-control, neither a deva nor gandhabba, nor a Mara banded with Brahmas, could turn that triumph back into defeat. This reflection from the Pāli Canon is from Thousands, Dhammapada Chapter 8…

The Fear of Being Peaceful

Ajahn Pasanno

The Fear of Being Peaceful

It is important to recognize that the nature of becoming is generated through the force of desire, tanha, of craving—craving for sensuality, craving for being—for a sense of self, to be somebody, to be something, or craving for non- being—that sense of pushing away, of aversion, of negation. The becoming mind then seeks an object that is either internal or external. What does that seeking look lik…

How Are We Holding the Practice?

Ajahn Pasanno

How Are We Holding the Practice?

How are we holding the practice? The Buddha taught many different aspects of technique and method, often from an organic, big picture, complete view. How do we encompass that for ourselves? How do we develop a context for using different methods, techniques and particulars of practice? One of the most clear and tangible examples showing the Buddha’s approach is the discourse in the Anguttara Nikay…

Dispassion or Aversion?

Ajahn Ñāṇadhammo

Dispassion or Aversion?

There was a layman who used to come and see Ajahn Chah who had a lot of complaints: his fields weren’t producing very much and his buffalo was getting old and his house wasn’t big enough and his kids weren’t satisfying him and… He said he was getting really sick of the world and becoming dispassionate. Ajahn Chah said, “No, you’re not. You’re not dispassionate. If you got more buffaloes, newer one…

A Positive Ideal to Cultivate

Ajahn Jayasaro

A Positive Ideal to Cultivate

In Dhamma practice, wisdom acts as the direct antidote to ignorance by examining the reality of life and the world with a stable, stilled and unbiased mind sustained in the present. The direct antidote to craving is the systematic and integrated development of wholesome mental states. In the case of love, the most prominent of these virtues are lovingkindness and the effort to be a good friend. Tr…